Tag Archives: CES

Disney unveils KeyChest technology

The Walt Disney Co on Tuesday unveiled a technology called KeyChest to enable consumers to buy films or television shows from various distributors, store them on remote servers, and play them on multiple platforms ranging from TVs to computers and phones.

Disney said it plans to roll-out KeyChest for both the U.S. and the international market, and that it will soon announce partners who will participate in the program.

“Discussions are going to step up dramatically at the Consumer Electronics Show,” said a Disney spokesman, referring to the upcoming technology conference in Las Vegas.

Disney said negotiations with content distributors, cable companies and telecommunications services have been ongoing for several months.

Disney hopes the technology will be deployed before the end of 2010.

The company also said a third-party company will operate KeyChest, and that it expects other studios to make their content available through the authenticating technology Disney has developed.

Company officials said the goal of KeyChest is to make it easy for viewers to see a movie accessed from various outlets and to address the issue of compatibility in maneuvering content from device to device as well as limited storage space on consumers’ hard drives.

She also said this was not intended as a Disney only venture.

“The idea is to have all the movies consumers want to buy available in this way,” said Kelly Summers, vice president of digital distribution at Disney, on Tuesday in a briefing about KeyChest. “If it’s Disney only, there really isn’t much value here,” she said.

Disney officials said they hope to use KeyChest to build momentum for the long-stalled digital distribution of films.

It comes at a critical juncture for the industry which saw the sale of films on DVDs and Blu-rays drop by an estimated 13 percent in 2009. Online sales of movies, the hoped-for bright spot for the industry, grew from $150 million to $250 million in 2009, but not an enough to offset the decline in physical sales.

With KeyChest, a consumer can buy a movie from a participating store. That customer’s account with other participating services, such as telecom services or cable companies, would be updated to show the film is available for viewing.

Summers stressed that KeyChest will not be a service that consumers access directly.

Rather, Disney envisions KeyChest as a program that retailers can tap into to verify that consumers have already purchased the right to access a movie, and then make that movie available to the consumer across different devices.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE60508P20100106

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Despite Risks, Internet Creeps Onto Car Dashboards

To the dismay of safety advocates already worried about driver distraction, automakers and high-tech companies have found a new place to put sophisticated Internet-connected computers: the front seat.

Technology giants like Intel and Google are turning their attention from the desktop to the dashboard, hoping to bring the power of the PC to the car. They see vast opportunity for profit in working with automakers to create the next generation of irresistible devices.

This week at the Consumer Electronics Show, the neon-drenched annual trade show here, these companies are demonstrating the breadth of their ambitions, like 10-inch screens above the gearshift showing high-definition videos, 3-D maps and Web pages.

The first wave of these “infotainment systems,” as the tech and car industries call them, will hit the market this year. While built-in navigation features were once costly options, the new systems are likely to be standard equipment in a wide range of cars before long. They prevent drivers from watching video and using some other functions while the car is moving, but they can still pull up content as varied as restaurant reviews and the covers of music albums with the tap of a finger.

Safety advocates say the companies behind these technologies are tone-deaf to mounting research showing the risks of distracted driving — and to a growing national debate about the use of mobile devices in cars and how to avoid the thousands of wrecks and injuries this distraction causes each year

“This is irresponsible at best and pernicious at worst,” Nicholas A. Ashford, a professor of technology and policy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said of the new efforts to marry cars and computers. “Unfortunately and sadly, it is a continuation of the pursuit of profit over safety — for both drivers and pedestrians.”

One system on the way this fall from Audi lets drivers pull up information as they drive. Heading to Madison Square Garden for a basketball game? Pop down the touch pad, finger-scribble the word “Knicks” and get a Wikipedia entry on the arena, photos and reviews of nearby restaurants, and animations of the ways to get there.

A notice that pops up when the Audi system is turned on reads: “Please only use the online services when traffic conditions allow you to do so safely.”

The technology and car companies say that safety remains a priority. They note that they are building in or working on technology like voice commands and screens that can simultaneously show a map to the driver and a movie to a front-seat passenger, as in the new Jaguar XJ.

“We are trying to make that driving experience one that is very engaging,” said Jim Buczkowski, the director of global electrical and electronics systems engineering at Ford. “We also want to make sure it is safer and safer. It is part of what our DNA will be going forward.”

Ford’s new MyFord system lets the driver adjust temperature settings or call a friend while the car is in motion, while its built-in Web browser works only when the car is parked. Audi says it will similarly restrict access to complex and potentially distracting functions. But in general, drivers will bear much of the responsibility for limiting their use of these devices.

Computer chips and other components improve every year while dropping in cost, allowing carmakers to introduce more sophisticated devices. Harman, based in Stamford, Conn., and a maker of such systems for cars, has created a pair of high-end multimedia systems due out this year that use full-fledged PC chips from Intel and Nvidia. Such chips once consumed too much electricity to be used in cars.

“We have always looked at the PC market with envy,” said Sachin Lawande, the chief technology officer at Harman, which works with Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Toyota and others. “They’ve always had these great chips we could not use, but now that’s changing.”

A complex new dashboard console from Ford, which it plans to unveil Thursday, brings the car firmly into the land of electronic gadgets. The 4.2-inch color screen to the left of the speedometer displays information about the car, like the fuel level, while a companion screen on the right shows things like the name of a cellphone caller or the title of the digital song file being played. An eight-inch touch screen tops the central console, displaying things like control panels and, when the car is not moving, Web pages.

The system has Wi-Fi capability, two U.S.B. ports and a place to plug in a keyboard — in short, many of the features of a standard PC.

The automakers’ efforts are backed by companies that make chips for PCs and that want to see their processors slotted into the 70 million cars sold worldwide each year.

“Cars are going to become probably the most immersive consumer electronics device we have,” said Michael Rayfield, a general manager at Nvidia, a chip company that on Thursday plans to announce a deal with Audi. “In 2010, you will sit in these things, and it will be a totally different experience.”

The giants of the industry contend they are giving consumers what they want — and the things that smartphones and the Internet have trained them to expect.

“Customers are expecting more and more, especially business people who expect to find in the car what they find in their smartphone,” said Mathias Halliger, the chief engineer for Audi’s multimedia interface systems. “We should give them the same or a better experience.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/07/technology/07distracted.html?ref=technology

Skiff unveils e-reader for newspapers, magazines

US company Skiff released details Monday of its upcoming electronic reader, a device slightly bigger than Amazon’s largest Kindle designed for reading newspapers and magazines in addition to books.

The Skiff Reader features an 11.5 inch (29.2-centimeter) screen, about two inches (five cms) larger than that of the Kindle DX, and is also the thinnest e-reader to date at just a quarter of an inch (0.63 cms), according to Skiff.

Skiff, which is backed by US newspaper and magazine publisher Hearst Corp., said wireless connectivity for the device, which weighs just over one pound (0.45 kilograms) will be provided by Skiff partner Sprint Nextel.

Skiff did not announce a price for the device, which will be available starting later this year in Sprint stores across the country and online.

Unlike the Kindle, which is geared mainly for book readers, Skiff said its device is the “first e-reader optimized for newspaper and magazine content.”

“The Skiff Reader’s big screen will showcase print media in compelling new ways,” Skiff president Gilbert Fuchsberg said in a statement.

“This is consistent with Skiff’s focus on delivering enhanced reading experiences that engage consumers, publishers and advertisers,” he said.

Skiff said its black-and-white touchscreen e-reader will feature next-generation “metal foil” e-paper technology from LG Display.

It said the thin, flexible sheet of stainless-steel foil is a step up from the “fragile glass that is the foundation of almost every electronic screen.”

The Skiff Reader will be displayed at the 2010 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) which opens in Las Vegas later this week.

As print advertising revenue evaporates and circulation erodes, US newspaper and magazine publishers have been looking to carve out a future on the Internet and with e-readers and mobile devices.

Online advertising revenue has been disappointing, however, and advertisers and readers have been generally underwhelmed by the presentation of newspapers and magazines on e-readers and smartphones.

Skiff would provide advertising alongside newspaper or magazine articles — a feature that is not currently offered by e-readers on the market such as the Kindle, which is tailored more to e-books than periodicals

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jkUj1nXgjvY-YKvm3dmmYURQz2Cw