Tag Archives: Cory Doctorow

Bristol bids to host Wikimania 2013

Bristol is bidding to bring the international Wikimania conference to the city in 2013. Wikimania is an annual event attended by influential speakers, writers and users of wiki projects such as Wikipedia. Run by the Wikimedia Foundation, if Bristol wins the bid to host the the week-long event, it could welcome the likes of Stephen Fry, Cory Doctorow, Jimmy Wales, Clay Shirky, and Tim Berners-Lee.

Bristol’s bid was submitted on Friday and now there is an online campaign growing to gather support. The city is up against competition across the world, including Hong Kong and Surakarta. Rival bids closer to home are London and Naples, Italy. Bristol recently welcomed Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, and also hosts the annual Festival of Ideas which attracts known writers and thinkers. Bristol’s bid promises that if successful, it will:

* Create a wide, generous and secure platform for the active involvement of community groups

* Build a bridge to the non-Wiki community (the Wikiless), inspire a new generation of volunteers

* Create a place and space where working relationships can strive, thrive and develop

* Spread the Wikipedia editing ‘privilege’ to involve more cultures, more women, more wisdom

* Enhance public understanding of shared, free and open source knowledge

* Celebrate and promote successful partnerships and Wiki achievements

This year’s Wikimania will take place in July in Washington DC.

To find out more visit the Bristol bid wiki.

http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/Bristol-bids-host-Wikimania-2013/story-15678650-detail/story.html

http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2013_bids/Bristol

Advertisements

Bono net policing idea draws fire

Bono, frontman of rock band U2, has warned the film industry not to make the same mistakes with file-sharing that have dogged the music industry.

Writing for the New York Times, Bono claimed internet service providers were “reverse Robin Hoods” benefiting from the music industry’s lost profits. He hinted that China’s efforts prove that tracking net content is possible. The editorial drew sharp criticism, both on its economic merits and for the suggestion of net content policing.

“The immutable laws of bandwidth tell us we’re just a few years away from being able to download an entire season of ’24’ in 24 seconds,” he wrote. “A decade’s worth of music file-sharing and swiping has made clear that the people it hurts are the creators…the people this reverse Robin Hooding benefits are rich service providers, whose swollen profits perfectly mirror the lost receipts of the music business.”

In a move that drew significant criticism, Bono went on to suggest that the feasibility of tracking down file-sharers had already been proven. “We know from America’s noble effort to stop child pornography, not to mention China’s ignoble effort to suppress online dissent, that it’s perfectly possible to track content,” he said.

Several commentators assailed both the logic of net monitoring and the economic arguments of the essay, pointing out that U2 topped 2009’s list of top-grossing live acts. “Bono has missed that even a totalitarian government…can’t effectively control net-content,” tweeted Cory Doctorow, a blogger and journalist noted for his study of file-sharing policy.

“If only greed and ignorance could sequester carbon, Bono could FINALLY save the planet,” he added

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8439200.stm